Luxury Cruise from Iceland to Edinburgh

From£5899 Per Person
Highlights
  • 2 nights stay in Reykjavik
  • 12 night Silversea Ultra-Luxury, All-Inclusive Cruise
  • Flights from Glasgow, Manchester, London
  • Details
  • Itinerary
  • Review
  • Photos

Luxury Cruise from Iceland to Edinburgh

Enjoy an Ultra-Luxury, All-Inclusive Cruise from Iceland to Edinburgh! Start your holiday experience with a 3-night, pre-cruise stay in Reykjavik prior to joining the Silver Whisper for your Ultra-Luxury, All-Inclusive Cruise. Sail the shores of Iceland and experience the country that travel buffs have been trying to keep secret for years. Beginning in Reykjavik, be charmed by the balance of fire and ice, sailing to the tune of long days and short nights. A day at then sea sets you up for the Faroe Isles and the Scottish Isles. And if you still haven’t found your inner Braveheart amid all the rolling moorland, we think a stroll down Edinburgh’s Royal Mile will surely do it!

Luxury Cruise from Iceland to Edinburgh

Luxury Cruise from Iceland to Edinburgh

12 July 2021

2 nights Reykjavik

12-night All-Inclusive Cruise

from £5899 pp

Luxury Cruise from Iceland to Edinburgh – Top Cityline Grand Hotel, Reykjavik

Luxury Cruise from Iceland to Edinburgh - Silver Whisper

The 4**** star TOP CityLine Grand Hotel Reykjavik is a first-class hotel for those who demand excellent service and facilities. All of the hotel 311 rooms are very spacious and equipped with first-class amenities. The TOP CityLine Grand Hotel Reykjavik is the first hotel in the world to undertake extensive works to eliminate electro-magnetic pollution.

The hotel staff takes pride in making your stay as enjoyable as possible. The first-class a la carte Restaurant Grand, offers a varied menu to suit every need. Enjoy the evening in a relaxing atmosphere at the Lobby-Bistro or at the fireplace in Lounge Tortastofa. The conference area offers rooms with over 2.000 sqm of meeting space with endless possibilities. Reykjavik Spa is a relaxing comfort zone with fitness room, massage, beauty parlor, hot tubs and sauna.

Restaurant
The first-class a la carte restaurant, Restaurant Grand, offers a varied menu to suit every need. Its chefs offer both international delights and mouth-watering, fresh Icelandic seafood specialties, whether you prefer a quick bite or a full 4-course dinner menu.
Lobby-Bistro – located in the lobby area serves light courses such as sandwiches and burgers. Additionally the bistro serves as a bar with happy hour offers.
Lounge Tortastofa is a beautiful lounge and bar with fireplace.

Room Amenities
The TOP CityLine Grand Hotel offers 311 very spacious rooms and suites in different categories, equipped with fridge, flat screen Sat-TV, iron and iron board, safe deposit box, coffee/tea making facilities, direct dial telephone, desk, full size mirror, private bath with bathtub/shower-combination, toilet, hair dryer and razor electrical socket. Rooms located in the tower provide an amazing view of the mountains or the city. All rooms have a non-smoking policy.

Location
The 4 star TOP CityLine Grand Hotel Reykjavik is situated in a quiet area within a short distance from all services, recreation and business centres. Laugardalslaug Iceland’s largest swimming pool complexes, Reykjavik family zoo and the botanical garden are within walking distance. Shops at Laugavegur shopping street are 1.5km away.

The Hotel offers a free shuttle service to city centre 3 times a day.

Luxury Cruise from Iceland to Edinburgh – Silver Whisper

Luxury Cruise from Iceland to Edinburgh - Silver Whisper

Silversea is committed to making your voyage unforgettable by taking you to the most beautiful destinations on the planet in the comfort and elegance that you deserve.

Silversea’s small luxury ships are designed for those who delight in the thrill of discovery while indulging mind and body in the most lavish surroundings imaginable. All accommodations are spacious, ocean-view suites that include butler service,and most include private verandas. Silversea voyages and cruise expeditions sail to over 900 destinations on all seven continents, more than any other cruise line.

Silversea’s personalized service remains their Jewel in the Crown
Breeze through embarkation and step into the warm welcome of white-gloved staff. Enjoy a flute of champagne as you are escorted to your suite. Renowned for culinary excellence and innovative spirit, Silversea’s luxury cruises offer a choice of open-seating dining options throughout the fleet, as well as several speciality venues aboard all non-expedition ships. Enjoy the ease, convenience and value of an all-inclusive cruise fare that includes almost all of your discretionary onboard expenses.

Included
Butler Service in Every Suite
All guests are pampered equally aboard our ships. We are the only cruise line in the world to include butler service in every suite, in every category. A staff-to-guest ratio of nearly one to one ensures that your every wish is fulfilled with earnest precision, from the concierge who can customise your voyage to the butler who serves your breakfast in suite.

Included
Beverages in-Suite and throughout the Ship
Select wines, premium spirits, specialty coffees, as well as bottled water, juices and soft drinks are complimentary in all bars and lounges. Your suite’s mini-bar is also stocked with your preferred beverages including wines and spirits. Your butler will replenish them upon request.

Included
Gourmet Dining
Delicious meals created with thought and panache, discerningly elaborated menus with perfectly balanced wine choices and a relaxed atmosphere with erudite friends – dining aboard any Silversea ship is the ultimate experience for people who only want superlatives. It just doesn’t get any better than this. Why not ask the couple you just met to join you? With our open-seating policy, arrive at your leisure and dine with whomever you please.

Included
Gratuities
Our unwavering commitment to flawless service requires an attitude that is totally focused on the part of every member of the staff. Their professional training is readily apparent from the waiter who keeps your water glass filled to the chef who prepares your favourite soufflé à la minute. Yet surprisingly gratuities are not expected. They’re included in your fare. *Please note: Beauty salon and spa treatment gratuities not included.

 

Price Includes

  • Flight from UK to Iceland
    Transfer to Iceland hotel
  • 2-night hotel stay in Reykjavik
  • 12 night All-Inclusive cruise on Silver Whisper

Itinerary

Luxury Cruise from Iceland to Leith
On arrival at Reykjavik, transfer to your chosen hotel for a 3-night stay.
Private transfer included.
The capital of Iceland’s land of ice, fire and natural wonder, Reykjavik is a city like no other - blossoming among some of the world’s most vibrant and violent scenery. Home to two-thirds of Iceland’s population, Reykjavik is the island’s only real city, and a welcoming and walkable place - full of bicycles gliding along boulevards or battling the wind when it rears up. Fresh licks of paint brighten the streets, and an artistic and creative atmosphere embraces studios and galleries - as well as the kitchens where an exciting culinary scene is burgeoning. Plot your adventures in the city's hip bars and cosy cafes, or waste no time in venturing out to Iceland’s outdoor adventures. Reykjavik’s buildings stand together in a low huddle - below the whip of winter’s winds - but the magnificent Hallgrímskirkja church is a solid exception, with its bell tower rising resolutely over the city. Iceland’s largest church's design echoes the lava flows that have shaped this remote land and boasts a clean and elegant interior. The Harpa Concert Hall’s sheer glass facade helps it to assimilate into the landscape, mirroring back the city and harbour. Its LED lights shimmer in honour of Iceland’s greatest illuminated performance – the northern lights. Walk in the crusts between continents, feel the spray from bursts of geysers and witness the enduring power of Iceland’s massive waterfalls. Whether you want to sizzle away in the earth-heated geothermal pools, or hike to your heart’s content, you can do it all from Reykjavik - the colourful capital of this astonishing outdoor country.
Check-out of your hotel and make your way to the port for embarkation on your Ultra-Luxury, All-Inclusive Silversea Cruise
As double acts go, Kirkjufellsfoss Waterfall and Kirkjufell Mountain are hard to beat. Said to be Iceland's most photographed spot, the perfectly symmetrical mountain taper of Kirkjufell complements the roaring waterfall, and is said to be the most photographed spot in Iceland. That's a bold claim, considering the country's abundance of natural assets, but this natural duo is an undeniably unique and mesmerising sight. Occasionally, as the sun fades away, a stunning trio is formed, with the northern lights dancing overhead, casting its ethereal green haze over the scene below. Reach the stirring views with a short walk from Grundarfjorudur town, or head out into the wilderness on horseback, along well-trampled bridleways. The mountain is known as Church Mountain, due to its isolated peak, which pierces the sky like a spire. You might recognise it as a 'mountain shaped like an arrowhead', however, which is how it was described during its Game of Thrones cameo. In Grundarfjorudur itself, fishing boats gently bob amid the dramatic, snow-flecked mountain scenery. With whales cruising the fjords and eagles diving overhead, you're also at the centre of some of Iceland's most spectacular and atmospheric wildlife. As a highlight of Iceland's glorious, cinematic scenery, Grundarfjorudur is sure to whet your appetite for Iceland's immense natural beaut
Sitting in the finger-like scenery of the Westfjords - which flays out from the mainland to form one of Europe’s most westerly points, Patreksfjordur has barely 700 inhabitants and - like so many Icelandic communities - is built on time-tested fishing traditions. Discover wonderful crowds of birdlife clinging to the dramatic cliffs, as you embark on adventures amid the Westfjords, discovering flat-topped mountains, cutting inlets and evocative, windswept beaches. With their bright beaks and amiable features, puffins are some of the most beautiful birds in the world - and they nest in huge quantities on Látrabjarg cliff, close to Patreksfjordur. Vertically steep and imposing, the birds are safe from predators like foxes here, as they live and breed on the dramatically steep drop-offs. Wander to see them thriving in their natural habitat, clinging to cliff ledges. You can also encounter gannets and guillemots, as well as an estimated 40% of the world’s Razorbill population. Rauðasandur beach is one of Iceland’s more unusual sights, a huge copper-red stretch of sand. Wander the dreamy shoreline, and photograph the remote, colourful collision of sea and sand. You’re also close to the majestic veil of Dynjandi waterfall, which fans out across 60 metres as it descends. After a tough day’s hiking, return to Patreksfjordur to admire fjord views and soak your muscles in an outdoor pool, as the stars begin to appear above. Or head to the muscle-relieving, naturally-heated, geothermal pools that murmur nearby.
A tiny town in the scenic north of Iceland, cosseted away by a jagged wall of mountain peaks, Siglufjordur is an isolated gem. With just over a thousand residents, Siglufjordur takes its name from the glassy fjord that stretches out nearby. Iceland's northernmost town, only a single-lane road tunnel, bored through the snow-capped mountains, provides a land link with the rest of the country. This evocative remoteness appealed to dark Nordic Noir writers - and the town has found recent fame as the star of the TV show Trapped. A much warmer welcome awaits you in real life than in fiction - fortunately. Siglufjordur is a historic Atlantic capital of herring fishing, and you can learn of the industry that gave the town its raison d'etre, and powered Iceland's economy at the award-winning Herring Era Museum. The biggest maritime-themed museum in Iceland, it spreads across three buildings and covers every element of the town's relationship with its fishing waters - from expedition to preparation and preservation. While the industry has dried up since its heyday, wander to the harbour for views of the pretty town's cherry and lemon coloured former warehouses. Swirling seagulls look for offcuts, while fishermen sandpaper and varnish tiny vessels. Take a boat out around the scenic fjord, or embark on lengthy hikes out and above this romantically isolated outpost. The sounds of beautiful duo vocal harmonies and accordions are often heard echoing along the streets, and the Folk Music Museum is an enchanting look into quaint, rural Icelandic culture. The Folk Music Festival causes the town's population to swell dramatically, as visitors make for these picturesque shores to play and perform each year.
There's simply nowhere better than Husavilk - the European capital of whale watching - for getting up close and personal with the majestic giants of the ocean. Feel the awe as whales breach the waves around you, before gulping in air and plunging away with almighty tale flicks. Pretty Husavik is framed by the majestic Húsavíkurfjall mountain, which swells up behind, creating a stunning backdrop for the town's tiny wooden warehouses, cherry red houses and undulating fishing ships. The little wooden church has been a beacon of light, guiding tired fishermen back to the shores of Iceland's oldest settlement, since 1907. Let the wind rip through your hair and the sea speckle your face, as you ride waves out among the region's almighty marine creatures, who throw their weight around so spectacularly. Sail among gentle giants in Shaky Bay, spotting humpbacks, minke whales and the world's biggest – blue whales. You may also see teams of smaller white-beaked dolphins skipping across the waves, displaying the full range of acrobatic skills. The town's whale museum is an interesting journey through Iceland's relationship with the sea giants, while its restaurants serve up local specialities – taste juicy reindeer burger and plokkfiskur, a buttery mash of local fish. Hikes and horseback rides into the surrounding countryside can take you up around Lake Botnsvatn, to views down from the slopes of the Húsavíkurfjall - where purple spired lupin flowers spill down amongst the emerald slopes. From the summit, look out over views of the bay, reaching out to the crumpled snowy peaks beyond. Or feel the full force of this land of natural power, at Dettifloss Waterfall, one of Europe's most powerful, thrashing flumes.
A world of tumbling waterfalls and colourful creativity, Seydisfjordur is Iceland at its most epic and eccentric. A spectacular fjord lends the town its name, and the structures are dwarfed by this majestic setting, as they huddle around its glassy waters. Sail around the fjord, head out on a kayak amid the scenery, or venture to meet Puffins and other nesting birds settled on sharp cliffs. Encounter sea lions, or try some fishing as you immerse yourself in this highlight of the wild and wonderful Eastfjords. Herring fishing sustained this settlement founded by Norwegians in 1848, leading to a town of colourful wooden buildings, which gleam white against the moody scenery's palette, providing a spirit-lifting splash of colour during the harsh winter months. A rainbow pathway leads to a pretty, pastel-blue church and there's more local art and culture to unravel at Skaftfell, which displays bright and bold contemporary art. Its bistro also serves up a perfect caffeine hit and refreshments. Waiting on the open jaws of the Seydisfjordur, this is a gloriously picturesque town, and the steep fjord banks reflect beautifully on the smooth waters below. The snow-capped Bjólfur mountain stands above the town and invites you to crunch along hiking trails amid untouched nature - rewarding with mesmerising views across the fjord and town below. These hills can literally sing thanks to a unique sculpture - which resonates with a traditional five-tone harmony. The remote and gorgeous Skalanes Nature reserve is a major draw, with 47 bird species resting on its dramatic bird cliff, along with countless plant varieties.
A day to relax and enjoy the facilities of Silver Whisper
Titanic scenery, mist-whipped mountains and staggering oceanic vistas await you here in the Faroe Islands - a far-flung archipelago of immense natural beauty. This remote and isolated gathering of 18 islands – adrift in the far North Atlantic Ocean – is a self-governing part of the Kingdom of Denmark, and colourful Tórshavn bustles up against the seafront, forming one of the tiniest capital cities in the world. Wander between pretty, half-timbered houses and visit one of the world’s oldest parliament buildings, during your time here. With Viking history swirling too, Torshavn is a quaint, charming and heritage-rich city. Surrounded by thrilling landscapes, and cosy Scandi culture, the Faroe Islands are an envy-inducing, off-the-beaten-track destination. From Torshavn, scatter to your choice of island destinations, or spend time soaking in the storybook appeal and clarity of air in the scenic old town. Pop into local shops or head for restaurants - where you can taste local foods like salt-cured fish and hunks of lamb. See waterfalls plummeting directly into the ocean from vertical cliffs, along with emerald-green carpeted fjords, as you explore these extraordinary, lost islands. Puffins and sea birds relish the island’s craggy sea cliffs and coastline – visit the island of Mykines to see the birds burrowing deep into the steep cliffs to nest. Strap on your hiking boots to rise to the challenge of the mesmerising scenery. Fjords etch into the coastline, and you can encounter peaceful lakes and massive valleys dug out by glaciers. Off-shore, sea stacks totter up out of the swelling, frothy waves.
Adrift between the Scottish and Norwegian coasts, the craggy Shetland Islands form the most northerly point of the British Isles. Sprawling across 100 islands, connected by sandy bridges and crisscrossing ferries, explore the highlights of this scenic archipelago outpost. With incredible Neolithic history, spanning 5,000 years of human heritage, these islands, which sit just shy of the Arctic Circle, are an isolated and immense treasure trove of history and thrilling scenery. Look out over dramatic coastline from atmospheric Iron Age towers. Sweeping, windswept beaches and wisps of sand connect islands and rugged cliffs - stand back as the sounds of the waves smashing against the shore and calling gulls fills the air. The islands are also home to some of the most adorable four-legged creatures you’ll ever meet, the diminutive and wavy-fringed, Shetland Ponies who roam the hills and reach a maximum size of 42 inches. Don't be fooled, though, they are amongst the strongest and toughest of all breeds. Their existence here points to Viking history, as local horses bred with ponies brought ashore by Norse settlers, creating the lovable crossbreed that is an icon of these islands today. The towering Broch of Mousa is perhaps Europe’s best-preserved Iron Age building - and one of the Shetland's finest brochs - a series of round, stone towers, believed to have been constructed around 100 BC. Seals and birdlife ensure that the isolated islands are always well-populated with life - and you can embark on hikes to discover their coastal homes. Lerwick is the islands’ capital, and there's a charming welcome on offer, as you arrive before the waterfront of stone buildings, which cascade down to the shore
Scattered just off the northern tip of Scotland, Kirkwall is the capital of the Orkney Islands - a scenic archipelago of fascinating, dual heritage. The Viking influence is deep, while a prehistoric past and World War history adds to the endless stories that these dramatic islands have to tell. Sparse and beautiful, let the sweeping seascapes of frothing waves, and dance of the northern lights, enchant you as you explore. Windswept beaches are inhabited by whooping swans, while grassy cliffs hide puffins amid their wavy embrace. Sea caves and crumbling castles - and the dramatic meeting of the North Sea and the Atlantic Ocean add to the romantic beauty of these lands, which may be physically close to the UK, but feel an entire world away. The sandstone St. Magnus Cathedral is the centrepiece of Orkney's main town - a place of winding lanes and atmospheric walks - and Britain's northernmost cathedral is a masterpiece that took 300 years to complete. Started in 1137, the beautiful cathedral is adorned with mesmerising stain-glass windows and has been evocatively named as the Light of the North. Look down over the ruined Bishop’s and Earl’s Palaces nearby from the tip of the cathedral's tower. Or, test out the islands' history-rich distilleries, which produce smokey single malts - said to be the best in the world. You can also venture out to Europe's best-preserved Stone Age Village, at the extraordinary World Heritage Site of Skara Brae, which offers an unparalleled vision into prehistoric life.
The Granite City sparkles like silver in the Scottish sunshine, and there is over 8,000 years’ worth of history to dig into in this pretty city of cobbled streets and hunched cottages. Located far to the north of the British Isles, Aberdeen is third only to Edinburgh and Glasgow in terms of size. Shaped by its maritime location, granite foundations and offshore oil industry, today’s Aberdeen is a prosperous powerhouse, alive with arts and culture. Surrounded by the Cairngorms Mountains’ sepia-hues – and the North Sea’s windswept coastline - Aberdeen was forged by the granite quarried from its earth. Local stone is everywhere from the Houses of Parliament to Waterloo Bridge – but arguably the finest examples of the material’s beauty are in the city itself. The barnacled spikes of Marischal College - the world's second largest granite building – and the grand turreted masonry of the Town House leave a lasting impression. Johnston Gardens add some colour to the city’s canvas, and you'll often spot wedding dresses floating among the blooming rhododendrons and ornate bridges. Aberdeen Maritime Museum takes visitors on a voyage through the region’s seafaring heritage, and North Sea oil exploration. Stop for a coffee and watch fishing vessels and trawlers toing and froing from the harbour, surreally mingling with city centre buildings in the unusually central harbour. Old Aberdeen is a fairy-tale walk of cobbled streets and eccentric stone houses where no stone is the same, while the Footdee fishing village, or 'fittie' as the locals pronounce it, consists of historic leaning cottages and ramshackle huts for the city's fishing community.
Edinburgh is to London as poetry is to prose, as Charlotte Brontë once wrote. One of the world's stateliest cities and proudest capitals, it's built—like Rome—on seven hills, making it a striking backdrop for the ancient pageant of history. In a skyline of sheer drama, Edinburgh Castle watches over the capital city, frowning down on Princes Street’s glamour and glitz. But despite its rich past, the city’s famous festivals, excellent museums and galleries, as well as the modern Scottish Parliament, are reminders that Edinburgh has its feet firmly in the 21st century.Nearly everywhere in Edinburgh (the burgh is always pronounced burra in Scotland) there are spectacular buildings, whose Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian pillars add touches of neoclassical grandeur to the largely Presbyterian backdrop. Large gardens are a strong feature of central Edinburgh, where the city council is one of the most stridently conservationist in Europe. Arthur's Seat, a mountain of bright green and yellow furze, rears up behind the spires of the Old Town. This child-size mountain jutting 822 feet above its surroundings has steep slopes and little crags, like a miniature Highlands set down in the middle of the busy city. Appropriately, these theatrical elements match Edinburgh's character—after all, the city has been a stage that has seen its fair share of romance, violence, tragedy, and triumph.Modern Edinburgh has become a cultural capital, staging the Edinburgh International Festival and the Fringe Festival in every possible venue each August. The stunning Museum of Scotland complements the city’s wealth of galleries and artsy hangouts. Add Edinburgh’s growing reputation for food and nightlife and you have one of the world’s most beguiling cities.Today the city is the second most important financial center in the United Kingdom, and the fifth most important in Europe. The city regularly is ranked near the top in quality-of-life surveys. Accordingly, New Town apartments on fashionable streets sell for considerable sums. In some senses the city is showy and materialistic, but Edinburgh still supports learned societies, some of which have their roots in the Scottish Enlightenment. The Royal Society of Edinburgh, for example, established in 1783 "for the advancement of learning and useful knowledge," remains an important forum for interdisciplinary activities.Even as Edinburgh moves through the 21st century, its tall guardian castle remains the focal point of the city and its venerable history. Take time to explore the streets—peopled by the spirits of Mary, Queen of Scots; Sir Walter Scott; and Robert Louis Stevenson—and pay your respects to the world's best-loved terrier, Greyfriars Bobby. In the evenings you can enjoy candlelit restaurants or a folk ceilidh (pronounced kay-lee, a traditional Scottish dance with music), though you should remember that you haven't earned your porridge until you've climbed Arthur's Seat. Should you wander around a corner, say, on George Street, you might see not an endless cityscape, but blue sea and a patchwork of fields. This is the county of Fife, beyond the inlet of the North Sea called the Firth of Forth—a reminder, like the mountains to the northwest that can be glimpsed from Edinburgh's highest points, that the rest of Scotland lies within easy reach.
Disembark the Silver Whisper and head for home.

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